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April 16, 2015

Bits and pieces from the first days of Perham

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LOGGNG

The following narration was taken from a tape recording given by Max Eckman for the Clearwater County Historical Society.

Mr. Eckman spent most of his life as a river man. His father was a lumberjack and river man. He started his river driving career in 1908, at the age of 16, living in a wanigan, which was a shelter for sleeping, eating, storage, or office space often mounted on a raft or boat.

He said wanigans were of various sizes, small ones at the beginning of the river and larger ones as you came to the larger part of the river. The larger ones had three tiers of bunks. Cooking was done on these larger wanigans.

In the earlier days, wanigans were made of rough-hewn timbers, caulked with okum and covered with pitch.

Occasionally, logs would pile up on rocks and rapids. These jams were usually loosened by dynamite charges. Skilled river men would locate the key log that was causing the jam.

River drivers would use peaveys, cant hooks and pike poles to keep the logs moving. When the logs went through lakes, the logs would have to be boomed and floated to the outlet with favorable winds. This, of course, was in the early days. In later years, scows and gas engines were used to pull the booms.

Max worked on the Otter Tail River at various times between 1900 and 1917. He mentioned working at Camp Number One on Long Lost Lake in Clearwater County. The logs went by railroad to Elbow Lake, then by water to Frazee, where they were sawn into lumber.

Once, he said, he worked for Nockols-Chisholm, whose headquarters were at Fergus Falls. He said that it was a fine company to work for, as the wages were $30-35 a month, with board. There were bonuses paid for finishing jobs.

The men ate meals at 6 a.m., 10 a.m., noon, 2 p.m. and 7 p.m.

 

LINDENAU PARK

In 1896, the Sons of Herman Lodge organized Lindenau Park at the Pete Schroeder Brewery near the Otter Tail River.

The park was so named because it was situated among the beautiful linden (basswood) trees. Just a short walk from the Fellerer brothers’ home, brings you to the original setting of this park.

Andrew Fellerer, father of the Fellerer brothers, was brewmaster at the Schroeder Brewery at the time the people enjoyed these outings.

Lindenau Park was a great drawing place for the Perham people. It had entertainment such as bowling, dancing and picnic facilities. The bowling balls were made of wood, and many didn’t have finger holes.

Beer brewed in the Schoeder Brewery was sold on the grounds. Horse-drawn carriages, furnished by the livery stables in Perham, were the means of transportation for the people from town.

Many people looked forward to Sunday, when they could spend the afternoon at Lindenau Park.

It has been said that the minister would announce the gathering from the pulpit, and sometimes even let church out early, so the people would have time to prepare to go to the park.

 

VIKING LEGENDS

Locally, there is lore of Viking ships sighted at the bottom of two lakes near New York Mills.

Vernon Jempsa of Fertile, Minn. is a promoter of the local legend. He was born and raised near New York Mills.

Three people came to the area to investigate the legend: Gerry Michel, a professional photographer; his wife, Georgiann, and her brother, Michael Shinabeck, an experienced scuba diver.

For two days, they explored the lakes. After a thorough search, they concluded that there was nothing to indicate the presence of any sunken boats in the lakes.

Other stories continue to surface, keeping the idea that the Vikings were actually in this area alive.

These are some of the stories: One story has been heard of a sunken ship in Big Cormorant Lake, near Lake Park, but the exact location was never pinpointed.

Older settlers at Ulen recalled a ship found half-buried, near the turn of the century, in the flats west of that village; but the location was never identified.

Perham settlers recalled a large boat that could be seen near the village, which children used to play on, before the turn of the century. This story was also never substantiated.

 

Information for this article came from the East Otter Tail History Book, Volume I, 1977, available online at www.HistoryMuseumEOT.com.   Lina Belar is the founder and retired director of the Friends of the History Museum of East Otter Tail County.

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April 1, 2015

Lawrence Ternus and 34 years of real estate

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Lawrence Ternus was born Nov. 25, 1919.  In December of 1950, he and his family moved from Nebraska to a farm east of Perham. The farm was purchased through the J.G. Durrenburger Real Estate Company. John Durrenberger had several businesses in Perham at the time, one of which was a real estate office he opened in 1950 near the old Post Office.

In 1959, Ternus began selling real estate for Durrenburger and in 1960, purchased the company and changed the name to Ternus Realty.

In 1972, the people of Perham decided they wanted a deputy registrar office here. A petition was drawn up and presented to the commissioner. Through the efforts of Roger Hanson, who was in the legislature at that time, they met with the commissioner and a deputy office was established. Lawrence Ternus was appointed deputy.

During the 34 years that Lawrence was in the real estate business, he saw many changes in the area.

In 1969, good lakeshore was selling for $10 a front foot.  Cabins were $3,000-4,000. Good farms for about $35,000, and houses in town for $10,000.

In those 34 years, Ternus Realty sold over 1000 parcels of property. Some of the properties were those of the early settlers of the area:   Drahmann Brothers, Ben Mohr Cafe, Mike Rebucks place, Herman Wessel farm, George Markell farm and the M.J. Daly house.

Through Mr. Durrenburger, who had been born in 1887, Lawrence met many of the early settlers, people like Herman Wessel, Charlie Lotterer, John Burelbach, Barney Lucking, John Kukowske, Jim Daly, Ed Siebels and Abe Diamond. These people liked to sit in his office and talk.

“I regret I didn’t tape these conversations,” he said in his interview for the East Otter Tail County History, Volume II, which was published in 1994.

In 1970, Frank Hammers bought the Ternus Insurance Agency which Lawrence had started in1963. In 1986, the Agency was purchased by Harold Overland.

Lawrence Ternus died on Jan. 10, 2008.  He is buried in St. Henry’s Cemetery.

 

Information for this article came from the Perham Enterprise Bulletin and the East Otter Tail History Books, available online at www.HistoryMuseumEOT.com.   Lina Belar is the founder and retired director of the Friends of the History Museum of East Otter Tail County.

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March 25, 2015

Women of Perham – Kathleen Guck

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March is National Women’s History Month and this year’s theme, “Weaving the Stories of Women’s Lives,” is an opportunity to write the contribution of women back into the essential fabric of our nation’s history. Accounts of the lives of individual women are important because they reveal exceptionally strong role models who share a more expansive vision of what a woman can do.

I couldn’t end this short series about remarkable women of Perham without including Kathleen Guck; not so much for her feats or accomplishments, as for the way she lived her life.

Called “Kathy” by everyone who knew and loved her, she was remarkable in that she always showed the world a positive attitude by having a smile on her face and a kind word for everyone she met.  Many people would say after knowing her for a short time, “That’s the way I want to be when I grow up.”

Kathleen Ruth Wasche was born in 1923, the daughter of Edward and Helen (Oswald) Wasche. She grew up around Bluffton, graduated from Wadena High School and attended St. Cloud Teachers’ College, where she distinguished herself in the declamatory contests. She taught commercial subjects in Morton, Minn. for three years. In 1947, she married Arthur “Johnny” Guck, who took over the management of his father’s farm. Two children were born to them, David and Kenny. Johnny died in 1985.

Kathy continued to live in the Perham area. She was an active member of the Perham VFW Ladies’ Auxiliary, the American Legion Auxiliary, the Perham Red Hat Club and TOPS. She volunteered at the History Museum of East Otter Tail County and the In Their Own Words Veterans Museum in Perham and was involved with a variety of community and church activities ranging from Turtle Races to Catholic Daughters.

She loved to travel and had a social calendar that was second to none as she attended concerts, art shows, plays and community events with an enthusiasm that was contagious.

Kathy was a very, very active lady who lived life to its fullest, right up to the end. She died last year in June at the age of 91. A tough act to follow, but I’m going to try.

 

Information for this article came from the National Women’s History Project, the Perham Enterprise Bulletin, and the East Otter Tail History Books, available online at www.HistoryMuseumEOT.org.  Lina Belar is the founder and retired director of the Friends of the History Museum of East Otter Tail County.

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March 11, 2015

Women of Perham – Mary Hemmelgarn

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March is National Women’s History Month and this year’s theme, “Weaving the Stories of Women’s Lives,” is an opportunity to write the contribution of women back into the essential fabric of our nation’s history. Accounts of the lives of individual women are important because they reveal exceptionally strong role models who share a more expansive vision of what a woman can do.

Mary Hemmelgarn was born on the 4th of July in 1918, shortly before the end of World War I. She was the daughter of Arthur and Katie (Pratt) Stromberg of Valentine, Neb. At the age of 17, she moved with her family to a farm near Perham. After high school, she went to Interstate Business College in Fargo, N.D., and was employed by Northwestern Bell.  In 1940, she began her 15-year career with Selective Service working in Perham, Fergus Falls, Park Rapids, and Detroit Lakes.

Mary married William “Bill” Hemmelgarn on Oct. 30, 1941.  In December 1941, right after Pearl Harbor, Bill volunteered for service along with thousands of others. He was called for duty in May of 1942, and served until November of 1945. He was discharged as an aviation radioman, first class. The fact that he was married to the clerk of the East Otter Tail Draft Board had no effect on his being called for duty. The Selective Service was in pursuit of draftees, clerk’s husband or not.  Mary’s signature was very likely on the draft notices of more than half the men drafted from this area.

After war was declared, the Selective Service office became very busy. There was no National Guard at the time, so everyone came through her office. Each month, Mary’s office was sent a list from headquarters in St. Paul that told them how many men they had to send that month. They had to fill those quotas.

The Draft Board, which was comprised of three men, went over the files and decided who was going to go. As the war escalated, it became even more hectic. Mary and her crew were there early in the morning, when it was still dark. They had an office at the old City Hall, and it was filled with men reporting for the draft. In a busy day, they might send out five busloads of men.

Following the war, Mary and Bill made their home in Perham, where they raised their children, Patricia Sue, born in 1944, and Richard Arthur, born in 1947.

Throughout her life, Mary was an active volunteer. As a charter member of the American Legion Auxiliary, Burelbach Post, Mary devoted more than 50 years toward her patriotic duties. However, she was best known for her more than 40 years of volunteer work at the Perham Memorial Home, where she endeared herself to both residents and staff. She was a member of the original Women’s Hospital Auxiliary and assisted with the initiation of the Red Cross Blood Bank in the Perham area.

In recognition of her accomplishments, Mary received several awards. In 1959, she was made an Honorary Recruiter by the U.S. Army Recruiting Service. She was honored by Gov. Rudy Perpich in 1989, for her work in the Retired Senior Volunteer Program. Mary was overwhelmed in 1999, when she was named Minnesota Volunteer of the Year by the Minnesota Health and Housing Alliance. That same year, she was presented to the Minnesota House of Representatives and received a standing ovation for her volunteer work. She was named the Perham Lions Citizen of the Year and was a member of the Perham Chamber of Commerce Hall of Fame.

Mary died on March 18, 2008 at the age of 89.

 

Information for this article came from the National Women’s History Project, the Perham Enterprise Bulletin, and the East Otter Tail History Books, available online at www.HistoryMuseumEOT.org.  Lina Belar is the founder and retired director of the Friends of the History Museum of East Otter Tail County.

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March 4, 2015

Women of Perham – Audrey Esser

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March is National Women’s History Month and this year’s theme, “Weaving the Stories of Women’s Lives,” is an opportunity to write the contributions of women in the essential fabric of our nation’s history. Accounts of the lives of individual women are important, because they reveal exceptionally strong role models who share a more expansive vision of what a woman can do.

Audrey Esser was one of a number of women who demonstrated that strength by enlisting in the service during World War II. Audrey Esser was born to John and Lillie (Parrish) Nobles in Butler County, Mo. on June 15, 1919. In May of 1943, she entered the U.S. Army Air Corp and served until October of 1945, rising to a final rank of Corporal.

Audrey was an instrument flying instructor in the Link Training Department, where simulators were used to expose pilots to training. She served in the Women’s Army Auxiliary Corps (WAAC), where she was one of seven women selected to become a flight instructor who would train pilots to safely land their planes during a blackout, or night mission.

She received her training at Daytona Beach, Fla., and advanced training at Kellogg Air Force Base, Mich. The remainder of her time was spent at Barksdale Field, Shreveport, La. There, she met her husband, Bob Esser. He was an altitude trainer instructor. They were married Feb. 10, 1945. At the end of the war, they made their home in Perham, raising seven children.

Bob became a plumber. In 1951, he worked in Thule, Greenland on a military construction project for four 9-month stints. When he returned to Perham, he continued plumbing and worked for Stan Sayer before buying that business and forming Esser Plumbing. In 1960, he became manager of the Perham Natural Gas Department and remained in that position for 25 years. In 1977, he sold Esser Plumbing to his son, Joe.  Bob died Nov. 19, 1985. He was a member of St. Henry’s Catholic Church, Knights of Columbus and the American Legion.

Audrey lived in Perham the rest of her life. She was a member of Catholic Daughters, Christian Mothers, VFW Auxiliary and East Otter Tail Unit of the American Cancer Society. She liked to travel, sew, cook, read, do water aerobics and garden. Her greatest joy was frequent visits from family and friends. Audrey Esser died Sept. 28, 2013, at the age of 94. She has many descendants in the area, all of whom can be proud of the contribution that she made to history.

 

Information for this article came from the National Women’s History Project, the Perham Enterprise Bulletin, and the East Otter Tail History Books, available online at www.HistoryMuseumEOT.org. Lina Belar is the founder and retired director of the Friends of the History Museum of East Otter Tail County.

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February 19, 2015

Early postal service and postmasters of Perham

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Perham’s location came within an ace of being located at the site of the old brewery on the Otter Tail River.

In 1872, Henry Kemper, then postmaster at Rush Lake, received orders to move his post office to that location. But since the Northern Pacific Railroad had already built a siding a mile west of the river, Perham’s current location, Kemper successfully petitioned the postal department to move the office there.

In June of that year, he and his partner, Henry Drahmann, erected the first wooden building in Perham, on the north side of the railroad track. This was the first mercantile business that was established in Perham. They secured a boot and shoe box and fitted it with pigeon holes, and this served as the first post office. The postmaster’s salary was then $12 a year.

When the Drahmann Store and Merchants’ Hotel was built on Main Street, where Thrifty White is now located, the post office was also moved there. Later, it moved across the street into what became the Weis Shoe Shop. Some years after that, the post office occupied a space where Dr. Ryan later established a chiropractic office. In 1962, a new post office building was erected on Main Street, on what was once the Globe Mill site.

Henry Kemper served as postmaster of Perham a total of 21 years. In the first hundred years of the post office, there were only 12 different postmasters, including: Henry Kemper (1872-1889), Stephen Butler (1889-1893), Martin Shea (1893-1897), Henry Kemper (1897-1901), George M. Young (1901-1914), Michael J. Daly (1914-1921), George M. Young (1921-1934), Casper W. Lotterer (1934-1938), John Mattfeld (1938-1940), Louise M. McGrann (1940-1941), John C. Grimm (1941-1944), Alfred A. Nelson (1944-1952), Lawler H. Olson (1952-1969), and Clarence W. Boedigheimer (1969-1976).

Boedigheimer began working for the post office in 1949 and was the first postmaster in the history of Perham to retire after completing 30 years of federal service. He was also the first letter carrier. Before then, mail had to be picked up at the post office.

During his years working for the post office, he saw many changes. Early on, mail arrived in Perham on four different trains each day. That was replaced by truck delivery once a day.

The name of Government Post Office was changed to U.S. Postal Service in 1971. Receipts climbed from $38,000 to $103,000. A new post office was built, with new equipment and fixtures that made for more efficient service. Letter carriers’ service grew from 30 stops to 550 per day for one carrier. At one time, postmasters were political appointments, but that changed to the merit system, which continues to this day.

Information for this article came from the “East Otter Tail History Books,” available online at www.HistoryMuseumEOT.org.

Lina Belar is the founder and retired director of the Friends of the History Museum of East Otter Tail County.

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February 4, 2015

Matt Winkels and the Winkels Carpet Center

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Matt Winkels was born in 1924 at the St. James Hospital in Perham. He was one of 17 children of Matt and Sarah Winkels, many of whom also married and raised children in the area.

In 1957, the junior Matt married Margaret Sonnenberg, the daughter of Fred and Ella Sonnenberg, who were farmers in Dead Lake Township. They had four children: Richard (Patty) Winkels, Sharon (Larry) Haarstad, Roger (Josie) Winkels, and Russell (Sheila) Winkels. Margaret was a clerk at the Kemper Drug Store in the early years of their marriage.

Matt began working in the Schoeneberger Furniture and Funeral Home at the age of 16 and worked there for 35 years. The business later became Perco Home Center. Starting in 1971, he managed the floor covering division. In 1981, he began Winkels Carpet Center. He retired in 1989 and his son, Richard, and his wife, Patty, now own and operate Winkels Carpet.

Matt was a veteran of World War II. He was inducted into the Army at Fort Snelling, Minn., in April of 1943 and took basic training at Fort Knox, Ky. After basic training he went to Fort Smith, Ariz., where the 16th Armored Division was being formed. He later went back to Fort Knox to attend Tank Mechanic School.

After completion of school, Matt was transferred back to Headquarter Co. of the 16th Armored Division. They left for the European Theater in December of 1944, landing at LaHavre, France. There, he joined with the 3rd Army in Germany under General Patton. They met up with the Russian Army in Czechoslovakia by V-E Day. Shortly thereafter, Matt was fortunate to reunite with two of his brothers, Alois and Leo, as all three were within a 50-mile area when the war ended.

Matt stayed in Germany for several months and was then discharged at Camp McCoy, Wis., in May of 1946.

Matt was also an antique car collector. He started by restoring a 1924 Model T coupe, then purchased a 1917 Model T from Meta Runge, who had purchased the car new from Marckels Implement. This led to a few Model As, early convertibles and a few other collectables made by Ford. Matt proudly displayed several of the prize cars at the Perham Pioneer Festival each year and attended many parades in the area.

He died in 2013 at the age of 89.

Information for this article came from “East Otter Tail History Book, Volume II, 1994,” as well as the WWII Supplement printed by the Perham Enterprise Bulletin. Lina Belar is the founder and retired director of the Friends of the History Museum of East Otter Tail County.

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January 30, 2015

The Tuskegee Airmen and their impact on local history

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The Tuskegee Airmen were America’s first black military airmen. Dedicated and determined, these young men enlisted during World War II in order to serve their country, at a time when there were many people who thought black men lacked intelligence, skill, courage and patriotism.

Many came from large metropolitan areas like New York City and Chicago, but their lives touched those of people from rural areas, as well. They served in segregated fighter squadrons, including the now famous “Red Tail” fighters who provided such tenacious bomber escort cover that they rarely lost a bomber.

Shortly after the In Their Own Words Veterans Museum (ITOW) opened in Perham, author Kim Russell presented a Reader’s Theatre version of her play, “Tuskegee Love Letters.” The play is based on letters, V-mails actually, between her mother and her father, a Tuskegee Airman.

At the time of the presentation, one of the volunteers at ITOW was Dorothy Ryan, widow of the late William K. Ryan. William had graduated from high school in 1943. A few weeks later he was drafted into the Army and served in the Army Air Corps in World War II with the 774th Bombardier Squadron and 463rd Bombardier Group serving in Italy.

After his military service, William attended the Logan College of Chiropractic in St. Louis, Missouri. In 1949, he set up a practice in Highland Village in St. Paul, and in 1953 he moved his family and practice to Perham, where he was a chiropractor for 34 years until his death from a heart attack in February of 1987.

Dorothy Ann Mayer married William in 1950. She remembered the stories he told her about his experiences in during WWII.

“I have always wanted to meet someone with the Tuskegee Airmen,” she said to Kim when they were introduced. “My Bill was with one of the Bombardier Groups in Italy during World War II. He told me that they ran into trouble on one of their missions and he didn’t think they were going to make it back. And then, like a miracle, the Tuskegee fighters appeared, and they were saved.”

She put her arms around Kim and gave her a big hug: “I don’t know if it was your father or not, but thank you anyway, from the bottom of my heart.”

In 1948, President Harry Truman enacted an executive order which directed equality of treatment and opportunity in all of the United States Armed Forces. In time, this order led to the end of racial segregation in the military forces. It was also the first step toward racial integration in the United States of America.

The positive experience, the outstanding record of accomplishment and the superb behavior of black airmen during World War II, and after, were important factors in the initiation of historic social change to achieve racial equality in America.

This story of the Tuskegee Airmen and how they impacted the life of one local veteran is the kind of amazing connection that happens more often than you’d imagine. The traveling exhibits at ITOW helped connect local stories with the stories of the larger world, often in surprising ways.

February is Black History Month, so I thought this would be a good story to include. The play, “Tuskegee Love Letters,” by Kim Russell, is being presented next month in Las Vegas.

Information for this article came from “East Otter Tail History Book, Volume II, 1994,” the Tuskegee Airmen National Museum and the personal papers of Lina Belar, founder and retired director of the Friends of the History Museum of East Otter Tail County.

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January 15, 2015

Origins of the Perham library

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The Perham Area Public Library was started in 1922 by the Women’s Club of Perham. It opened to the public in the old City Hall with a mere handful of books.

The committee that worked on the plan consisted of Bernie Kemper, Superintendent Randolph, Dr. Juergens, Mrs. Casper Lotterer, Mrs. Harry Davis, Mrs. Ben Esser, Mrs. A. Schwarzrock, Flora McDonald, and Anne Pancratz.

In the late 1920s, when the Burelbach Post of the American Legion thought of buying the Episcopal Church for a meeting place, they proposed that the building also be used as a library. As long as the post existed, the members would have the right to meet in the building. (This is why the library was always closed on Thursdays.)

Submitted photo. Built as the Episcopal Church of the Redeemer in 1887, this historic stone structure housed the Perham Area Public Library for many years

So the Legion purchased the remarkable stone building from J.B. Miller and Grant Woodard. It had been built in 1887 by a Scottish stonemason, Nathaniel McConachie, and used for only a few years as an Episcopal church before various disagreements split up the congregation and many members joined the Methodist Church, which became known as the Methodist Episcopal Church.

In 1939, Dr. Frank Brabec proposed that a community hall be added to the building. The city of Perham had to own the building in order to get a grant, so the city bought it from the Legion.

The library suffered through many lean years. Fundraisers kept it going, but buying books and materials on $350 a year was impossible, so when Royale Arvig became mayor, the library received $150 a month and the librarian rejoiced.

Dozens of volunteers worked at the library, giving a financial assist to the city. Catherine Drahmann, the librarian for many years, provided countless hours of volunteer time. Mrs. Al Schoeneberger was the cataloguer for 50 years, at no charge.

In 1978, the library became a member of the Viking Library System, which helped to improve financing. It also helped to provide patrons with many services besides books. Movies, audio books, CDs, a copier, magazines, fax machine, computers and more have since become available to the public.

Circulation (the number of items borrowed by patrons in a year) grew from 6,800 in 1970 to 63,000 in 1993. In 1984, the community hall was renovated and the library, which was suffering from lack of space, expanded into that side of the building.

In 1978, Catherine Drahmann became the first paid librarian. By 1994, there were two assistant librarians, Mary Jane Coates and Helene Pettit, and a summer librarian, Marie Doll. Those on the Service Board of Volunteers included Vera Bigler, Mary Helen Zitzow, Helen Lindberg, Jan Bennison, Marie Doll, Elsie Christie, Mary Holper, Audrey Johnson, Jeanette Kupferschmid, Becky Stolee, Joan Happel, Martha Lehmkuhl and Jeanne Schoeneberger.

The Executive Board consisted of Jeanette Kupferschmid – President, Vera Bigler – Vice President, Elsie Christie – Secretary, Jan Bennison – Past President, Mary Holper – Member-at-Large, Helen Lindberg – Member-at-Large and Lina Belar – Viking Library

Information for this article came from the “East Otter Tail History Book, Volume II, 1994” as submitted by Catherine Drahmann. Lina Belar is the founder and retired director of the Friends of the History Museum of East Otter Tail County.

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January 7, 2015

Train wrecks are part of Perham’s history

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The Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railroad line through Perham has been an economic lifeline for the community ever since it was finished in 1872.

Tens of thousands of trains have gone through Perham in the last 143 years. Typically, they come and go with little notice, other than their loud horns and by tying up the traffic at crossings.

On at least three occasions, however, they haven’t made it through town because wrecks have occurred. One was in the early 1940s and another occurred in 1947, when two trains hit head-on in a snowstorm. But the train wreck of Oct. 1, 1992 was undoubtedly the most spectacular.

At that time, an eastbound BNSF freight train was just approaching the edge of Perham when a semi-trailer apparently fell off one of the cars. As it fell, it either struck a switch or got wedged under the train, causing a derailment to begin near the Holiday Station, about four blocks west of the stoplights.

Car after car derailed from the train, which was doing about 60 miles per hour at the time. As they derailed, they slid and tumbled toward the heart of the downtown area, threatening businesses such as Crane Johnson Lumber, the Perham City Offices, Strom’s Cafe, Ma’s Little Red Barn, Coast to Coast, Ace Hardware and others. Fortunately, one of the cars hit the loading dock at the Burlington Northern depot and came to a halt. That acted as a stopper for the rest of the cars, so instead of sliding, they began piling up.

When the train finally stopped, most of the 31 derailed cars were in a huge mound stretching westward about a block from the depot. Other than the depot building, which was wrecked, the only other structural damage was to a loading shed. Some adjacent vehicles were damaged or wrecked, one squished down to about two feet thick.

Submitted photo The BNSF train depot in Perham, in 1956. The depot was ruined in a train wreck in 1992.

One of the most incredible aspects of the accident is that there were no major injuries, despite the fact that it occurred at about 5:30 p.m. on a Thursday afternoon.

There were a number of eye-witnesses to the event. Some people got pinged by flying rocks or shards from railroad ties, but there were no serious injuries. The town was lucky in another regard, too, because the train also had at least two cars with hazardous materials, one loaded with molten sulfur and another with propane. They were both behind the 31 cars that derailed and weren’t a factor in the wreck.

Cleanup crews hustled to Perham to get the mess cleaned up as quickly as possible and to get the railroad line open again. The westbound lane was re-opened 37 hours later, and the eastbound lane eight hours after that.

Information for this article came from “East Otter Tail History Book, Volume II, 1994.” Lina Belar is the founder and retired director of the Friends of the History Museum of East Otter Tail County.